Avoid Contact With Algae, Department of Health and Human Services Warns

Humboldt County Press Release:

Officials with the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) are warning recreational users of all fresh water bodies to avoid contact with algae this summer and early fall.

Low flows along several local rivers including the South Fork Eel, Van Duzen and Mad Rivers, coupled with sustained high temperatures in the inland areas and record low rainfall have created the ideal conditions for rapid blooming of blue-green algae.

Blue-green algae can be present in any fresh water body. It looks like green, blue-green, white or brown scum, foam or mats floating on the water. Usually it does not affect animals or people. However, warm water and abundant nutrients can cause blue-green algae to grow more rapidly than usual. These floating algal masses or “blooms” can produce natural toxins that are very potent. Dogs and children are most likely to be affected because of their smaller body size and tendency to stay in the water for longer periods.

DHHS is aware of 11 dog deaths which may have been caused by blue-green algae poisoning since 2001. The dogs died shortly after swimming in Big Lagoon, the South Fork Eel River and the Van Duzen River. Last year there was a reported dog illness that was suspected to be caused by toxic algae on the Mad River near Blue Lake, but this was not confirmed by water samples.

Most algal blooms in California contain harmless green algae. While the presence of blue-green algae toxins have been confirmed in some instances on the South Fork Eel and Van Duzen Rivers, it is difficult to test and monitor the many miles of our local rivers with conditions that may readily change. Most blooms do not contain toxins. To stay safe, it is best to assume that an algal bloom has the potential to contain toxins.

Blue green algae blooms that produce a liver toxin have been documented in Klamath River reservoirs and the Klamath River this year. Current status of this river may be found at the Klamath Basin Monitoring Program website: http://www.kbmp.net/maps-data/blue-green-algae-tracker.

Potential symptoms in dogs following exposure to blue green algae toxins can include lethargy, difficulty breathing, salivation, vomiting, urination, diarrhea, or convulsions. People can experience eye irritation, skin rash, mouth ulcers, vomiting, diarrhea, and cold or flu-like symptoms. While there is no antidote for exposures, persons should see their physician and those with pets which may have been exposed should go to their veterinarian for supportive care.

DHHS officials recommend the following guidelines for recreational users of all freshwater areas in Humboldt County:

  • Keep children, pets and livestock from swimming in or drinking water containing algal scums or mats.
  • Adults should also avoid wading and swimming in water containing algal blooms. Try not to swallow or inhale water spray in an algal bloom area.
  • If no algal scums or mats are visible, you should still carefully watch young children and warn them not to swallow any water.
  • Fish should be consumed only after removing the guts and liver and rinsing fillets in tap water.
  • Never drink, cook with or wash dishes with water from rivers, streams or lakes.
  • Get medical attention immediately if you think that you, your pet, or livestock might have been poisoned by blue-green algae toxins. Be sure to tell the doctor about possible contact with blue-green algae.

Human activities can have a big effect on nutrient and water flows in rivers, streams or lakes. Phosphorous and nitrogen found in fertilizers, animal waste, and human waste can stimulate blooms. Excessive water diversions can increase water temperatures and reduce flows. People can take the following measures to prevent algal blooms in our waters:

  • Be very conservative with the use of water, fertilizers and pesticides on your lawn, garden or agricultural operation.
  • Recycle any “spent” soil that has been used for intensive growing by tilling it back into gardens. Or protect it from rainfall to avoid nutrient runoff.
  • Plant or maintain native plants around banks. These plants help filter water and don’t require fertilizers.
  • Pump and maintain your septic system every three to four years.
  • Prevent surface water runoff from agricultural and livestock areas.
  • Prevent erosion around construction and logging operations.
  • Join or support one of the many watershed and river organizations.
  • Contact the Humboldt County DHHS Division of Environmental Health at

    445-6215 or 1-800-963-9241 for more information. People may report unusual blooms or conditions, including pictures, to Environmental Health by emailing envhealth@co.humboldt.ca.us . For more details, visit the California Department of Public Health’s website: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/healthinfo/environhealth/water/Pages/bluegreenalgae.aspx

~ from Kym Kemp / Today @ 7:47 a.m.

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Blue-Green Algae Blooms in Eel River and Big Lagoon

This is a Blue-green Algae warning: There have been recent blooms on the Eel River and Big Lagoon. Stay out of areas where it has formed. Children and pets are particularly at risk. (See information on the effects below in the press release.)

Blue-green algae forms most often when high levels of phosphorous or nitrogen occur in warm, calm bodies of water.

Humboldt Health Alert Press Release:

Blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, are simple plants found naturally in water and wet environments. Blue-green algae prefer warm stagnant nutrient rich water and are found most often in ponds, lakes, and slow moving rivers. Some species of blue-green algae produce toxins, so skin contact and ingestion can be dangerous. Children and pets are at the greatest risk of serious toxic effects from blue-green algae.

A bloom is a build-up of algae that creates a green, blue-green, white, or brown coloring on the surface of the water, sometimes occurring as mats or scum.

Although blooms can occur at any time of year, they occur most often in the warmer months between June and September.

In Humboldt County, Big Lagoon and the Eel River have seen recent blooms.

To stay safe, always assume that a blue-green algal bloom has the potential to be toxic. Do not drink or swim in water with scum layers or blooms.

See the flyer below from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) for more information:

flyer1

Flyer2

~ from kymkemp.com

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Wildfire Smoke Public Service Announcement

It’s official. The North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District has issued an air quality alert about the smoke in our area.

Smoke from these fires is drifting into Northern California.

The main fires generating the smoke Northern California is experiencing are the Labrador and the Douglas Complex wildfires.
Depending on your proximity to the fires and the weather conditions, people in Northern California will be affected.

Wildfire Smoke Public Service Announcement:

Areas of wildfire smoke are predicted to impact the following regions:

  • Del Norte County
  • Humboldt County
  • Trinity County

If you live (or plan travel) in the regions listed above, please watch for Air Quality Alerts issued for specific locations. Alerts are issued when unhealthy or hazardous conditions exist.

Air Quality Alerts can be heard by calling the North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District’s 24 hour Air Quality Advisory Information hotline at 1-866-BURN-DAY (1-866-287-6329).

They can also be accessed at the District’s website at www.ncuaqmd.org.

For air quality announcements, stayed tuned to your local radio, newspaper, and television.

Concentrations of smoke may vary depending upon location, weather, and distance to the fire. Smoke from wildfires and structure fires contain harmful chemicals that can affect your health. Smoke can cause eye and throat irritation, coughing, and difficulty breathing. People who are at greatest risk of experiencing symptoms due to smoke include:

those with respiratory disease (such as asthma), those with heart disease, young children, and older adults.

Children, the elderly, and those with respiratory disease or heart disease should stay indoors and avoid prolonged activity.
All others should limit prolonged or heavy activity and time spent outdoors.

If you can see, taste, or feel smoke, contact your local health department and/or primary healthcare provider. This is especially important if you have health concerns, are elderly, are pregnant, or have a child in your care.

Follow these general precautions to protect your health during a smoke event:

Minimize or stop outdoor activities, especially exercise

Stay indoors with windows and doors closed as much as possible

Do not run fans that bring smoky outdoor air inside – examples include swamp coolers, whole- house fans, and fresh air ventilation systems

Run your air-conditioner only if it does not bring smoke in from the outdoors. Change the standard air conditioner filter to a medium or high efficiency filter. If available, use the “re-circulate” or “recycle” setting on the unit

Do not smoke, fry food, or do other things that will create indoor air pollution.

If you have lung disease (including asthma) or heart disease, closely monitor your health and contact your doctor immediately if you have symptoms that worsen. Consider leaving the area until smoke conditions improve if you have:

  • repeated coughing
  • shortness of breath
  • difficulty breathing
  • wheezing
  • chest tightness or pain
  • palpitations
  • nausea
  • unusual fatigue
  • light headedness

NORTH COAST UNIFIED AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
2300 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501
Telephone (707) 443-3093

http://www.ncuaqmd.org

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Warning! Blue-green Algae Possible in Local Bodies of Water

Press Release from Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS):

Officials with the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) are warning recreational users of the South Fork Eel, Van Duzen, Klamath and Mattole rivers, Big Lagoon, Freshwater Lagoon and all other freshwater bodies to avoid contact with algae this summer.

Low flows along the South Fork of the Eel River as well as the Van Duzen, coupled with sustained high temperatures in the inland areas, have created the ideal conditions for rapid blooming of blue-green algae.

DHHS is aware of 11 dog deaths that may have been caused by blue-green algae poisoning since 2001. The dogs died shortly after swimming in Big Lagoon, the South Fork Eel River and the Van Duzen River.

A nerve toxin associated with blue-green algae was found in the stomachs of the dogs that died on the South Fork Eel River in 2002. The same toxin was found in water samples from the South Fork Eel and Van Duzen rivers in 2009 just after two dogs died. This poison is the most likely cause of the dog deaths on these rivers. Dogs are more vulnerable than people because they may swallow the toxin when they lick their fur. The onset of symptoms can be rapid; dogs have died within 30 minutes to one hour after leaving the water.

Blue-green algae blooms that produce a liver toxin have been documented in Klamath River reservoirs and the Klamath River this year. The current status of this river may be found at the Klamath Basin Monitoring Program website: http://www.kbmp.net/blue-green-algae-tracker.

Blue-green algae can be present in any freshwater body. It looks like green, blue-green, white or brown scum, foam or mats floating on the water. Usually, it does not affect animals or people. However, warm water and abundant nutrients can cause blue-green algae to grow more rapidly than usual. These floating algal masses, or “blooms,” can produce natural toxins that are very potent. Dogs and children are most likely to be affected because of their smaller body size and tendency to stay in the water for longer periods.

Potential symptoms in dogs following exposure to blue-green algae toxins can include lethargy, difficulty breathing, salivation, excessive urination, vomiting, diarrhea or convulsions. People can experience eye irritation, skin rash, mouth ulcers, vomiting, diarrhea and cold- or flu-like symptoms.

DHHS officials recommend the following guidelines for recreational users of all freshwater areas in Humboldt County:

  1. Keep children, pets and livestock from swimming in or drinking water containing algal scums or mats.
  2. Adults should also avoid wading and swimming in water containing algal blooms. Try not to swallow or inhale water spray in an algal bloom area.
  3. If no algal scums or mats are visible, you should still carefully watch young children and warn them not to swallow any water.
  4. Fish should be consumed only after removing the guts and liver and rinsing fillets in tap water.
  5. Never drink, cook with or wash dishes with water from rivers, streams or lakes.
  6. Get medical attention immediately if you think that you, your pet or livestock might have been poisoned by blue-green algae toxins. Be sure to tell the doctor about possible contact with blue-green algae.

Human activities can have a big effect on nutrient and water flows in rivers, streams or lakes. Phosphorous and nitrogen found in fertilizers, animal waste and human waste can stimulate blooms. Excessive water diversions can increase water temperatures and reduce flows. People can take the following measures to prevent algal blooms in local waters:

  1. Be very conservative with the use of water, fertilizers and pesticides on your lawn, garden or agricultural operation.
  2. Recycle any “spent” soil that has been used for intensive growing by tilling it back into gardens, or protect it from rainfall to avoid nutrient runoff.
  3. Plant or maintain native plants around banks. These plants help filter water and don’t require fertilizers.
  4. Pump and maintain your septic system every three to four years.
  5. Prevent surface water runoff from agricultural and livestock areas.
  6. Prevent erosion around construction and logging operations.

For more information, contact the DHHS Division of Environmental Health at 707-445-6215 or 1-800-963-9241. People may report unusual blooms or conditions, including photographs, to Environmental Health by emailing envhealth@co.humboldt.ca.us. The California Department of Public Health website also has more details at www.cdph.ca.gov/healthinfo/environhealth/water/Pages/bluegreenalgae.aspx.

~ www.kymkemp.com

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Emergency planners ask for public’s help..

Survey to take pulse of county’s disaster preparedness

Kaci Poor/The Times-Standard
Posted: 05/29/2013

Humboldt County emergency officials are looking to the public to help better prepare for future natural disasters and clear the way for pre-disaster mitigation funding.

County residents will have until late August to complete an online survey that will be used by a coalition of county, city and special services district officials to update the Humboldt Operation Area Hazard Mitigation Plan. The plan, created in 2008, addresses a variety of potential natural hazards — like floods, fires, tsunamis and earthquakes — that could affect local residents, and identifies projects for funding that could help reduce damages should such events occur.

Cybelle Immitt, a senior planner for the county who organized the survey that went online last week, said the survey is part of a required five-year plan update to ensure eligibility for future mitigation funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Immitt said both the city of Fortuna and the Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District have used the plan to secure FEMA grant funds for disaster mitigation infrastructure projects.

”With both of those entities relying on the FEMA funds, we are kind of under the gun to stay on track with this plan update in order to maintain our eligibility,” she said.

Humboldt Bay Fire Chief Bill Gillespie, who sits on the 14-member steering committee for the plan update, said while the survey is chiefly designed to help officials prepare the updated plan, it will also provides officials with insight into the community’s disaster readiness. The survey’s questions range from where residents get their emergency information, to whether they feel prepared for a natural disaster and if they have emergency equipment like fire alarms, disaster supply kits and battery-powered radios.

”The feedback will help paint a profile of the knowledge, understanding and preparedness of residents on the North Coast,” he said. “That way, we can tailor our public education and other projects to meet those needs.”

Humboldt County Public Works Deputy Director Hank Seemann, who also sits on the steering committee, said it is important that residents from across the county take the time to fill out the survey.

”We invested a lot time to develop a robust survey so that we could really take the pulse of the local community in terms of awareness and opportunities to reduce risk and exposure to those risks,” he said. “The more responses we get, the more statistically significant the results are.”

Immitt said officials are aiming for 2,700 respondents, or about 2 percent of the county’s total population.

”It’s a lofty goal, but we will see,” she said. “We already have 200 respondents, and that is just from the small amount of exposure the survey has gotten so far.”

In addition to the online survey, the steering committee will hold two public workshops on July 10 at Fortuna’s River Lodge and July 11 at the Arcata Community Center before a draft of the plan update is submitted for preliminary review in September.

To take the survey online, visit /www.surveymonkey.com/s/HumboldtCohazmit. Paper copies of the survey will also be available at both public workshops for those without Internet access. For more information about the FEMA Local Hazard Mitigation Program, including documents, links, meeting agendas and minutes, visit co.humboldt.ca.us/natural-resources/hazardmitigation/

Kaci Poor can be reached at 441-0504 or kpoor@times-standard.com

~from http://www.times-standard.com/news/ci_23343221/emergency-planners-ask-publics-help-survey-take-pulse

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North Coast Cal Fire Gearing Up for a Dangerous Year

fire_image

“We are monitoring conditions and preparing for a very active summer,” explained Cal Fire Battalion Chief Jeremy Monroe. He says that his agency samples different vegetation components and the results are worrisome. “We’ve been seeing fuel moisture…like in 2008, the year we had the late June lightning fire.“ That year nearly a thousand fires swept California in a few short days. Monroe says, “The conditions in the wildlands are similar [to then].”

According to Jeff Tonkin of the US National Weather Service, rainfall in Eureka is at 82% of normal and similar numbers are in other areas across the region. Furthermore, he says, “The bulk of the precipitation fell in December. The earlier part of the winter was when we got most of the water.” He adds that we’ve had a somewhat dry spring and this will cause the North Coast region to be even more prone to fire danger than just having lower rainfall. Later rains can help ameliorate the issues but the last few months have been unusually dry.

Cal Fire’s Monroe says that unlike Southern California where, according to Robert Jablon of the Associated Press, “..fire crews have responded to more than 680 wildfires since the beginning of the year — some 200 more than average for the period,” our region has seen about the normal amount of fires so far.

On the other hand he says that on April 24th, the day that broke heat records in McKinleyville and Eureka, Cal Fire responded to unusually high number of fires. “The first incident we had…was up in West Haven. It was a 1/2 acre—human caused.” He adds that it was “well accessible and resources were able to knock it out quickly.” Then, he says, there was one near Miranda—a kiln started up and some sparks started a fire. “Then our helicopter was returning from a training mission and saw two fires on the Yurok reservation. These were both related —human caused and still under investigation. He adds, “If the weather continues as its been, the grasses will dry and we’ll see potentially more fire activity.”

That day, he says, “was an anomaly. It was a warm day. [But] if it gets hotter and warmer and dryer, the possibility of ignition is greater.”

According to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, fire crews in the Southern part of the state are already increased staffing in response to the perceived danger. Monroe says, “They staff sooner because they are in the southwest. They have a lot more grass and brush.” However, he says, “We’re trying to get resources up and running—bringing everything up two weeks earlier then what was planned. This could change. If they have a lot of activity is Southern California, this might cause us to bring our staffing up [even] earlier. We’ll be bringing personnel and equipment on….Our dozers will be staffed seven days a week. The helicopter will be staffed full time. All the seasonal staff—the firefighters—we’ll get them trained.”

The answer to this situation is not fear but preparation, says Monroe. “For us, the message that we like to get out to the public is our Ready Set Go program. For anyone who lives in the wildlands, go to www.fire.ca.gov . This site gives ideas and tips on how to prepare yourself and your home… .”

In addition, Monroe notes, “We can’t control natural fires but human caused fires we can.”

He says, “This is not appearing to be a normal year. It could change but it could be really active or it could fizzle out. ” He notes that that what started the 2008 fires mostly were lightning strikes and “We can’t predict what the weather will do throughout the summer…The lightning is a variable that you can’t predict.” He adds ruefully, “The rule I always tell people is I’ll tell you in November… Seriously I’ve been this around 26 years now but the biggest variable is the weather and you can’t predict…that well long term.”

Related Links

Ready for Wild Fire
Family Communication Plan PDF

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Difficult Traveling Conditions in and around Humboldt

The bluffs between Garberville and Redway are clear at this time (10:15am).
The CHP is reporting that Hwy 101 between Weott and Myers Flat has flooding. The road is not closed but is very wet. There are Flooded signs.
They are also reporting icy conditions south of Leggett.

CALTRANS REPORTS:

CHAINS ARE REQUIRED ON ALL VEHICLES EXCEPT 4-WHEEL-DRIVE VEHICLES WITH SNOW TIRES ON ALL 4 WHEELS
- ON INTERSTATE 5 (I5)

- FROM 10 MI NORTH OF REDDING /AT FAWNDALE RD/ TO 24 M NORTH OF REDDING (SHASTA CO)

- FROM 3 MI SOUTH OF DUNSMUIR /AT MOTT RD/ TO 3 MI NORTH OF WEED /AT EDGEWOOD RD/ (SISKIYOU CO)

- FROM THE JCT OF SR 3 (TRINITY CO) TO PLATINA (SHASTA CO)

- ON Hwy 36 From 3 MI EAST OF MAD RIVER TO 5 MI WEST OF FOREST GLEN (TRINITY CO) /SOUTH FORK MOUNTAIN/

- ON Hwy 96 FROM 2 MI EAST TO 10 MI EAST OF HAPPY CAMP (SISKIYOU CO) /CADE MOUNTAIN/

Hwy 299 – Winter weather carry chains
Hwy 101 – Winter weather carry chains

1-WAY CONTROLLED TRAFFIC 7.8 MI EAST OF THE JCT OF SR 299 (HUMBOLDT CO) – DUE TO A SLIDE

For those traveling outside the area this weekend, this website has traffic cameras from Oregon Mountain Summit on Hwy 299 just west of Weaverville to the Nevada state line, and from Red Bluff north to the Oregon border:
Northern Traffic Cameras

~from KymKemp.com


Power Outages
Redway:
2 outage(s) affecting 234 customer(s)
Cause: PG&E will be assessing the cause of your outage.
Status: Awaiting assessment
Start Time of Outage: 12/22/2012 08:19:00 AM
Est. Time of Restoration: Not Available
Last Updated: 12/22/2012 09:28:15 AM

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Snow level dropping to 500′ on Tuesday

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE EUREKA CA
510 AM PST MON DEC 17 2012

NORTH COAST INTERIOR – UPPER TRINITY RIVER

MONDAY AND MONDAY NIGHT
Scattered showers across the area will continue into this afternoon. Another 1 to 3 inches of snow is possible in the highest passes this afternoon as snow levels slowly fall.

TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY

SNOW LEVELS WILL PLUMMET TUESDAY TO NEAR 500 FT AT THEIR LOWEST.
Another pulse of moisture will arrive on Wednesday and meet the cold air. This has potential to cause significant snowfall across much of NW California Wednesday into Thursday. Unsettled weather will remain into the weekend.

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Fernbridge may be flooded and impassable tonight

Update: 3 December 2012 8:00am
The rivers have crested and are now dropping. The Eel River at Fernbridge reached 22.88 feet before sinking this morning at 6:15 to 18.7 feet. The Eel River’s level at other points and other rivers’ levels can be seen here.
~from KymKemp.com

Press Release:

    SHERIFF’S OFFICE: AVOID EEL RIVER AT FERNBRIDGE AREA:

With projected reports the Eel River at Fernbridge could reach 24 feet tonight, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is encouraging the public to avoid the area.
“If this projection is accurate, Highway 211 at Fernbridge may be flooded and impassable late this evening until early morning when the river recedes,” the office said in a statement released Sunday afternoon. “The Sheriff’s Office and Humboldt County Public Works Department are taking steps to ensure equipment and personnel are ready to respond if needed to surrounding areas. The Sheriff’s Office of Emergency Services is in contact with the Department of Water Resources. The public is encouraged to avoid the area this evening.”
Officials also remind the public to stay away from flooded areas and do not drive across flooded roadways.

More info here

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Saturdays Storm Damage Report

Update 6 December 2012

Photos, rainfall info, and high water info from the National Weather Service – Eureka.


Update 3 December 2012

Landslide currently blocking Cartwright Rd., near Mile Marker 10 Mattole Rd., near Honeydew, check out this amazing video! thanks for the video Mariah! ~Terri Klemetson
This video was post to KMUD’s Facebook page:

KMUD’s Facebook page

Video by Mariah Gregori: Thanks Terri. It looks like the road has been reopened at least temporarily so people are getting their cars out before this next rain.
3:45pm
Mariah Gregori: I don’t know if it is mile marker 10. It is about 4 miles from the Honeydew store towards Panther Gap.
4:00pm

~from KMUD.org and KMUD News Facebook group.


Update 7:35pm

Kym has some photos.

Updated 10:45am

From the Times Standard

ROAD CONDITIONS (Humboldt County Department of Public Works)
Road Conditions at 10:45 a.m.
Closed due to Flooding or High Water:
Port Kenyon Road in Ferndale between Market Street and California Street
Meridian Road in Ferndale between Port Kenyon Road and Centerville Road
California Street in Ferndale between Port Kenyon Road and Van Ness Avenue
Kimtu Road in Garberville at Camp Kimtu
Glendale Drive near McKinleyville
Hookton Road at Eel River Drive near Loleta
Howard Heights Road in Eureka
Berta Road in Eureka
Zane Road in Eureka
Wrigley Road (end of road) in Eureka
Close Due to Slide or Slip Out:
Blue Slide Road near Ferndale (corrected by bobbi)
Mattole Road post marker 4.5
Flooded, Not Closed
Dyerville Loop Road, post marker 2.64 (four wheel drive only)
Crannell Road (four wheel drive only)
Freshwater Road (Several locations)
Old Arcata Road at Jacoby Creek
Old Arcata Road, between Redmond Road and Ole Hanson Road
Other Restrictions:
Sprowel Creek Road near Leino, 1 lane
Mattle Road post marker 13.66, 1 lane
Etc.:
The boat at McCann will not be operating today due to large amount of debris in water.


Well we made it through the first round of storms with little to no damage in the immediate area.
Saturday Forecast :
weather image

Unfortunately, this storm battered us badly. Many trees down and flooded roadways, slides and mud flows.

Kym has a report here. And much more info coming in from the comments area as people get out and see what the damage is, so keep checking back on this one.

I talked with Marty Messenger, County Roads Supervisor, to get the most local updated info on Sunday morning at about 9am.

Update from Marty:

Briceland Thorn Road is passable (but flooded) at the Whittemore Grove bridge.
Camp Kimtu Road is closed – the river is over the road.
They are keeping the bluffs clear, but it’s muddy there.
They are finishing up a slide on Sprowel Creek Rd.
The roads are open from Whitethron and Ettersburg into Redway and Garberville.

I will update this as news comes in.

Another source for local road info is:
CHP
and
CHP Watch.

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